A Chicago Cubs baseball fan who uses a wheelchair has filed a federal lawsuit alleging that the $750 million renovations of Wrigley Field that is currently underway have illegally removed some wheelchair accessible seating, the Chicago Tribune reported.

David F. Cerda, who has muscular, said the team’s decision to move handicapped- accessible seats behind home plate back several rows made it impossible for people with disabilities to see when people in front of them are standing.

The lawsuit says the younger Cerda has suffered damages because he has not and cannot enjoy seating at Wrigley Field which complies with the ADA, per the Tribune.

Cerda’s father, lawyer David A. Cerda, filed the suit on his son’s behalf. He said the Chicago Cubs “have a duty to comply” with the Americans with Disabilities Act’s requirement that “wheelchair spaces be an integral part of the seating plan,” according to the lawsuit.

“When you rebuild it from the ground up, it’s a new building and you have to comply with the ADA,” the older Cerda said.

A Cubs spokesman declined to comment on the pending litigation. The stadium is in the fourth year of what’s expected to be a five-year renovation project.

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